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OSU Urban Arts Space exhibit explores new art media

Caitlyn Wasmundt / Lantern reporter

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A 26-foot pillar made of clothing, a bunker made of torn pillows and more displays created by artists’ eyes.

“Object/Imprint,” a new exhibition held at the OSU Urban Art Space, begins Tuesday.

The show, proposed by co-curators and participants Joshua Foy and Melissa Vogley Woods, is intended to display works made by artists who have been trained in traditional works and mediums, but whose work has outgrown those same classic techniques.

The show will feature various local artists. Woods and Foy developed the concept two years ago. The hardest part of presenting the idea for the show was coming up with the title and getting the title and the artwork to correspond with each other, Foy said.

Woods and Foy worked together to find artists they were comfortable with, along with artwork. “Object/Imprint” is a display of art that has been created to show an object or an idea and its imprint on the artist.

Foy’s piece in the show, currently untitled, is a 26-foot tower of clothing in the shape of the Washington Monument, which Foy said resonates with him on a number of levels.

Foy said his original idea was three smaller works of art, each as a tribute to family members who passed away. The three smaller works grew into one massive piece when Foy toured the gallery and saw the space provided to him.

The tower’s construction was made to pay tribute to Foy’s grandmother, he said.

“She was a fashionista before her time,” Foy said.

Each artist’s work fits into the show differently, Woods said.

Foy said his work fits in a couple of different ways. The obelisk is a symbol of wealth and power and the clothing represents his grandmother and the imprint she left on his life, Foy said.

Woods’ style of art coincides with the show in a different manner. A reoccurring theme in Woods’ work deals with houses and the connection of neighborhoods.

Woods, who will have six-to-eight pieces displayed, uses found objects as her medium. Anything from pillows to plaster and rope are worked into Woods’ designs.

The house is the imprinted object for Woods.

“(It shows) how I can’t let go of the house as a context of my work,” Woods said.

Woods said she does not see a time where the house does not make its way into her work.

“Object/Imprint” will be displayed from Tuesday to March 3 and is free to the public.

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