Home » A+E » Album review: Lynyrd Skynyrd’s southern sound no ‘Dyin’ Breed’

Album review: Lynyrd Skynyrd’s southern sound no ‘Dyin’ Breed’

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Fans of classic rock and followers of Southern-anthem powerhouse Lynyrd Skynyrd surely won’t be disappointed by the band’s new album “Last of a Dyin’ Breed.” While many artists are experimenting with new styles and reaching out to a younger generation, Lynyrd Skynyrd stays true to its down-home roots as shown by its latest project.

Despite coming nearly 40 years after the band’s first album, “(Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd)” which was released in 1973 and featured almost a completely different lineup of band members, “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” serves up the same country-rock aesthetic that brought Lynyrd Skynyrd to superstardom.

In times when people are more likely to listen to dubstep than classic rock, Lynyrd Skynyrd comes close to striking lightning twice with a number of tracks featured on its new album.

Songs such as “Mississippi Blood” and title track “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” will likely bring listeners right to a front-porch rocking chair in the Deep South just as old Lynyrd Skynyrd favorites did.

It’s hard to get more in-tune with the Southern anthem ideal of freedom than Lynyrd Skynyrd does in “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” as lead vocalist Johnny Van Zant sings, “Saddle up baby, ride up close to me / An open highway’s all I’ll ever need.” The song is filled with lyrics describing the open road over a hard, steady beat and guitar riffs that line up with the band’s classic style.

If there is to be any complaint about Lynyrd Skynyrd’s album of summer hits, it’s that it and the freedom that comes with it came out just in time for summer to end. While the album’s sound could appeal to a younger crowd, there’s a strong chance that “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” will fall through the cracks and only resonate with those who follow the band.

If anything, it’s clear Lynyrd Skynyrd named its album after itself, as it certainly is the “Last of a Dyin’ Breed” of true, Southern-rock creators.

 

Grade: A-

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