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Exploring different sounds, tones essential for Columbus-based band Conversion Delay

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Columbus-based band Conversion Delay is set to play at 9 p.m. on Aug. 22 at Circus Columbus. Credit: Courtesy of Facebook

Columbus-based band Conversion Delay is set to play at 9 p.m. on Aug. 22 at Circus Columbus. Credit: Courtesy of Facebook

“We play loud enough to disturb our neighbors. Frequently,” is the mantra of Columbus’ alternative rock band Conversion Delay.

Comprised of singer and keyboarder Nathan Grosh, bassist JD Johnston and drummer Nick Allen, the band takes pride in its high-energy stage presence no matter the venue.

“We make it a personal goal, every time we play a show, no matter whether there is five people in the room or whether we have all eyes on us, to bring a lot of live energy to everything,” Johnston said. “We explore a lot of different sounds and a lot of different moods, there is a lot of different times where there is a really quiet intensity that has a tendency to build and explode.”

Along with the intensity, the band strives for the crowd to remember its performance.

“If you did not walk away humming one of our songs then we didn’t put on a good enough show,” Johnston said.

In May 2012, the band started as a two-piece set made up of Grosh and Johnston. The two recorded enough music to release their first album, titled “Stepping Stone,” on March 26. Despite, what each considers to be a successful album, Grosh and Johnston had their sights set on expansion.

“We spent a chunk of time as the two piece but we wanted more,” Johnston said. “There came a time where (Grosh) and I felt like we have reached what this two-piece band can reach.”

After meeting online, Grosh and Johnston invited drummer Allen to jam with them.

“He came out and it clicked instantly and fit perfectly. So now we had our drummer,” said Johnston.

Since, new opportunities have been opened.

“With me coming in, it opened up possibilities drum-wise and rhythm-wise. We are no longer restrained to keyboards and loops,” said Allen.

The new elements have opened up innovative opportunities in the studio as well.

“Our new material is exploring an electronic feel,” Grosh said. “Which is kind of interesting because it is juxtaposed against this feeling of a live drummer for the first time and a lot of organic things going on to try and create something that is similar to a rigid dance feel.”

Conversion Delay is scheduled to play its next show 9 p.m. Aug. 29 at Circus, located at 1227 N. High St.

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