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OSU students form sketch club to help others hone drawing abilities

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A sketch by third-year in art, Sam Ming, who cofounded the OSU Sketch Club about a month ago.  Credit: Courtesy of Sam Ming

A sketch by 3rd-year in art, Sam Ming, who cofounded the OSU Sketch Club about a month ago.
Credit: Courtesy of Sam Ming

A typical Saturday for many Ohio State students consists of tailgating and consuming football from sunrise past sundown. But for members of the OSU Sketch Club, some Saturdays are filled with trips to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

“A lot of parents notice what we’re doing and will point this out to their kids who might be interested in drawing,” said club co-founder Sam Ming, a third-year in art.

The OSU Sketch Club is an outlet for students interested in improving their artistic skills and are interested in sketching and drawing around Columbus. The club was started meeting about a month ago.

Harpal Khosla, a third-year in computer science and engineering, and Ming, who met while attending Dublin Scioto High School, decided to form the club in order to help people develop their drawing skills.

“(The club) prompts improvement,” Ming said. “We don’t tell people they have to go home and practice six hours a day to get better.”

Ming said there is an inherent improvement in an artist’s ability to draw when they practice sketching, which helps the artist understand how the world looks visually.

Ming acts as the club’s mentor to help and critique anyone who asks. He said he provides different methods of sketching and drawing to participants and also has drawing reference books available for members of the club.

“They’re not books like ‘How to Draw Dragons’ or something,” Khosla said. “But more anatomy and drawing faces types of reference books.”

Khosla said the group members have tried Ming’s methods, as well as inspired other members to try different techniques when sketching.

“We have one member who suggested to another member to use colors and ink in their work rather than just using pencil,” Khosla said.

Ming said he has also been inspired by the members to try different techniques.

“I now work in a style that leans toward simplicity,” Ming said of the influence of the member’s techniques.

Ming said there is no required fee to join.

The club meets Thursdays at 3 p.m. in room 334 at Hayes Hall, and from there, the group decides where to sketch that day. Khosla said he also encourages members to hold their own sketch meetings.

“There is a solid four or five people who come to the club,” Khosla said. “I have had like 10 to 15 people email me that they’re interested. I’m hoping more people come.”

Larry Ebert, a fifth-year in electrical engineering, said the idea of the club is “nice for some people,” but that he would not join.

“I’m terrible at art,” Ebert said. “I’m not artistic-minded.”

Despite anyone’s artistic abilities, Khosla encourages everyone to sketch.

“Just draw,” Khosla said. “It’s art. You’re supposed to have fun with it.”

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