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Adam DeVine takes break from work, talks of getting weird behind the scenes

March 21, 2014

burden.52@osu.edu
Adam Devine (left), Anders Holm and Blake Anderson of 'Workaholics' at Spike TV's Guys Choice Awards in Culver City, Calif., June 8.  Credit: Courtesy of MCT

Adam DeVine (left), Anders Holm and Blake Anderson of ‘Workaholics’ at Spike TV’s Guys Choice Awards in Culver City, Calif., June 8. 
Credit: Courtesy of MCT

Thursday night does not seem like an ideal night for people to get weird, but with Adam DeVine, anytime seems like the right time to be weird.

Performing in front of an Ohio State crowd, the the Ohio Union Activities Board sponsored the event titled “Getting Weird with Adam DeVine” in the Archie Griffin Ballroom. DeVine told stories ranging from guys in clubs who you don’t want to mess with to the time when his mother found a used condom of his and claimed he was no longer her baby boy.

DeVine’s popularity can be attributed to his show “Workaholics,” but since his rise to fame on the show, he has begun to expand his roles within the industry. He played a major part in the movie “Pitch Perfect,” stars in his own show “Adam Devine’s House Party” and has recently been casted as a character on the hit ABC comedy “Modern Family.”

On “Workaholics,” he and his cast mates, Anders Holm and Blake Anderson, are notorious for drinking and doing drugs at an unhealthy rate all while finding a way to work at the same time.

When the event turned toward the Q-and-A portion of the show, Devine was struck with an array of questions from whether he wanted to go out and smoke weed with students to which members of the cast he has had sex with.

Kelsey Storer, a third-year in human nutrition, said one of her favorite shows on TV is “Workaholics,” and the DeVine show was a fun experience.

“‘Workaholics’ is a great television show and Adam is my favorite character on the show,” Storer said. “I am glad he came to Ohio State because his standup is unorthodox but comical at the same time.”

Bridget McGovern, a third-year in environmental science, said she did not know what to expect from DeVine or the crowd throughout the night.

“I have been looking forward to this show for a while and was curious as to how he would interact with the crowd,” McGovern said. “He is always talking about getting weird on his show and what transpired was exactly what I wanted to happen.”

DeVine said his comedic style has changed over time and wants to keep doing what he is doing for as long as he can.

“I started taking comedy more seriously after dropping out of college in different capacities like sketch comedy or improv or more stand up,” DeVine said. “I really like the work we are doing on ‘Workaholics.’ We are actually working on a movie, and we want to keep doing it for as long as people will watch it.”


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