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Native Cold Pressed provides healthy juice options in Short North

April 10, 2014

cameron.883@osu.edu
The inside of Native Cold Pressed juice bar, located at 18312u3012 N. High St.  Credit:

The inside of Native Cold Pressed juice bar, located at 771-A N. High St.
Credit: Erica Mauder / Lantern photographer

Two Columbus natives are attempting to bring a healthful option to the Short North in the form of raw and organic juice.

Native Cold Pressed juice bar opened in the Short North in early February by Nicole Salvo and Erin Thacker.

“We wanted to bring a healthy, to-go, pick-up product that was raw and organic to the Short North area because it wasn’t here,” Salvo said.

Thacker took her experience in the Columbus area opening restaurants and bars and channeled it toward the pair’s new goal of bringing a market for cold pressed juice to the area.

“We are both deep into yoga practice and work a lot with intention and goal-setting,” Salvo said. “Sending gratitude out to the world and the law of attraction was huge for us.”

They used the philosophies behind yoga to help build the brand of Native, and it took about a year for the women to fully prepare to open their doors to Columbus.

“It has been a great reception,” Salvo said on the way the Columbus community has reacted to the shop. “The cold pressed method is something that is not widely understood in Columbus yet, but we are here to educate people on the benefits of it and why it’s a higher quality juice.”

Salvo explained that juice, along with providing three pounds of produce in one 16-ounce glass jar packed with minerals and enzymes that help with digestion, provides many holistic benefits.

“Incorporating juice into your day is amazing because it speeds up digestion and gives your body a little break from having to digest,” Salvo said. “It is the most efficient way to absorb nutrients because with juicing, it goes straight to your blood stream.”

Salvo and Thacker did a lot of market research to perfect their menu, but also found that trial and error was how a lot of their menu flavors were formed.

“It really started in my living room,” Salvo said about how they began concocting flavors. “We sat down two or three times a week at my house just to juice together.”

Sixteen-ounce bottles run between $8 and $10, while 8-ounce bottles range around $4 to $5.

After many attempts, trouble-shooting and trying flavors that did not work well together, they decided on a diverse menu with flavors such as spicy carrot, sweet beet and green grapefruit.

Although the juice bar is not in walking distance to campus, at just ove ra mile down High Street, some Ohio State students have enjoyed the different vibes it brings to Columbus.

Laura Rickrich, a third-year in communication, was first introduced to the juice bar via social media. She said her interest was sparked and was excited to try it.

“The place is so cute and quaint, something you expect to see in the Short North,” Rickrich said. “The workers were so friendly and offered information about the different options.”

Rickrich said she doesn’t know much about juicing but has been getting into the idea more since Native Cold Pressed opened.

“(It’s) quite the trend,” Rickrich said. “It’s nice to eat and drink things that make you feel good.”

Another OSU student who enjoys the new addition to the Short North is Taylor Young, a second-year in radiological sciences and therapy.

“Every employee is educated on the juice and willing to answer all questions and share the benefits of all the juice they offer,” Young said. “I think that if you are educated on the products, they can be very beneficial.”

Native Cold Pressed is located at 771-A N. High St. The juice bar is open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays.


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