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Zoning commission approves Pavey Square conceptual design

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An artist's rendering, looking south on North High Street, shows The View Pavey Square development, which snakes behind historic homes on North High Street. Credit: Courtesy of BBCO Design

An artist’s rendering, looking south on North High Street, shows The View Pavey Square development, which snakes behind historic homes on North High Street. Credit: Courtesy of BBCO Design

The View on Pavey Square mixed-use development was conceptually approved by the University Area Review Board Thursday night, marking a step forward for the development that is set to displace Cazuela’s Grill.

The UARB approved the design form of the building that is set to stretch between 2247 and 2289 N. High St., and the next step is the submission of a foundation permit by the developers, Celmark Development Group and Solove Real Estate.

Project architect BBCO’s conceptual design presentation, the last of multiple conceptual reviews with the board, was met again with questions and opposition by the board members and community in attendance. In contrast to the original design proposal of 12 stories, the View on Pavey Square is set to have five.

“We’re begrudgingly accepting this is going to be built at five stories, but it’s been a real win for the neighborhood in terms of bringing the community together,” Aaron Marshall, a member of Protect Old North!, a civic group in the community, said.

The architects have been asked to present an exterior lighting plan, landscaping plan, and building material samples at the next UARB meeting, which is set for Oct. 20.

“We’re socially responsible, as local developers we’re responding to the student housing market needs, but we also have conceded greatly as we value the comments of the neighborhood,” said Mike Balakrishnan, president of Celmark.

Additionally, UARB requested that the architects present a new design mockup detailing a new west facade panel design, south side building horizontal facade removal, increased window depth, retirement of material breaks and consistency in preserving neighborhood character through greater brick continuity.

“This win tonight does not mean resident involvement in the community is over by any means,” said D’Lyn Stinziano, vice president of the University Community Association, another civic group.

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